The Art of Electronics

Category: Engineering
Author: Paul Horowitz, Winfield Hill
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by Balgair   2020-04-15
The super basics are here: https://www.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/0521...

You'll first have to become 'fluent' in EE, but for a physicist, it's just spending the time and getting used to things. Not terrible, long, but straightforward.

As towards what the article is talking about, you need to be trained in it. Honestly, you have to apprentice with the Greybeards (they are mostly men, but not always). There are other ways, like reading through Intel docs or the manuals for ICs or digging through forum posts from 2003. But those guys in the basement with funny newspaper clippings from the 80s or old xkcd printouts are a much better return on your time. They have tons of knowledge about specific chips and machines, stuff that is nearly impossible to recite unless prompted. You just got to spend long lunches blabbering with them, despite their strange political and societal views. Just listen to them, then write down every little thing they said. They are gold in terms of hardware.

by Anon84   2019-12-15
Horowitz's "The Art of Electronics" is excellent: https://www.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/0521... I spent many a fun afternoon with it back in the day.
by ThunderFalcon_3000   2019-11-17

Okay, I think i may have came across a great source for those who want to learn more about video.

Video Tutorials

Also some books I would suggest for those who are at least somewhat knowledgeable of electronics:

Active Filter Cookbook

CMOS Cookbook

Art of Electronics

​

I would also highly recommend brushing up on your math, if you want to build more advanced electronics. It's not impossible to learn, just take your time.

by [deleted]   2019-11-17

Only kind of people that mishandle books say that (/s).

But seriously, borrowing to people and (in case of technical books) reference material. And some of them are really fucking expensive

by Enlightenment777   2018-11-10

$FREE = Lessons In Electric Circuits - 6 PDF books, 2700 pages.

$FREE = Electricity & Electronics Training - many older modules, scroll down for links to other modules.

$FREE = Engineer's Mini Notebooks - many older booklets.

$20 = Make - Electronics , 2nd edition, 2015.

$30 = Make - More Electronics , 1st edition, 2014.

$21 = Practical Electronics for Inventors , 4th edition, 2016.

$23 = Complete Electronics Self-Teaching Guide with Projects , 4th edition, 2012.

$97 = The Art of Electronics , 3rd edition, 2015. The 2nd edition is great too.

by mountaingaze683   2018-11-10

I went through Electronics Engineering and built a Midi-CV converter for a eurorack module as a final project. Here's the resources that helped me during that time:

Make: Analog Synthesizer's By Ray Wilson

Music From Outerspace

Electronotes.->I highly recommend the MUSICAL ENGINEER’S HANDBOOK and ELECTRONOTES BUILDERS GUIDE AND PREFERRED CIRCUITS COLLECTION sold there.

Art of Electronics. ->This will be your bible during school.

Midi Standard

Eurorack Mechanical Spec

Eurorack Electrical Spec

Try and build a DIY kit. That will definitely be an easy transition (based on difficulty of the DIY) into the process of building modules/synths.

Refer to the resources pinned to this subreddit.

I would also highly recommend getting to know your professors. If they're teaching electronics, chances are one of them might be into "synths" as well.

Good Luck!

by Enlightenment777   2018-11-10

$FREE = Lessons In Electric Circuits - 6 PDF books, 2700 pages.

$FREE = Electricity & Electronics Training - many older modules, scroll down for links to other modules.

$FREE = Engineer's Mini Notebooks - many older booklets.

$20 = Make - Electronics , 2nd edition, 2015.

$30 = Make - More Electronics , 1st edition, 2014.

$21 = Practical Electronics for Inventors , 4th edition, 2016.

$23 = Complete Electronics Self-Teaching Guide with Projects , 4th edition, 2012.

$97 = The Art of Electronics , 3rd edition, 2015. The 2nd edition is great too.

by 0xf8   2018-11-10
I much prefer reading to videos. My suggested online resource: http://lcmtuf.coredump.cx/electronics/

Print: The Art of Electronics https://www.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/0521...

by godelski   2018-11-10
^ +

Ben Eater - Builds his own 8 bit computer and walks you through all the steps

https://smile.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/05...

by olooney   2018-10-04
That's interesting. We used Horowitz and Hill as an undergrad and although I didn't continue on the EE track I was under the impression it was the "standard" textbook for introductory electronics. It may be more elementary than the ones you mention. Any thoughts on that text?

https://www.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/0521...

by syedkarim   2017-09-26
The Art of Electronics, 3rd Edition, by Paul Horowitz

https://www.amazon.com/Art-Electronics-Paul-Horowitz/dp/0521...

by MusicPi   2017-08-19

http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/ This might be a good place to get started, I am taking a physics electronics advanced lab as an undergraduate in physics, and I have found this textbook to be pretty useful. Also Hororwitz's the art of electronics is probably the best text on electronics, however very dense (1200 pages). There is definately a lot to learn, and this is just getting you started in the electronics of it... idk specifically about tube amps though, but understand circuits is probably going to be a must

link to buy horowitz: https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0521809266

by TseehnMarhn   2017-08-19

GET TEST EQUIPMENT.

Playing around with electronics and building stuff is the real education. School is school, and you've been there once before, so you know the drill.

But having your own test equipment allows you to explore electronics on the most practical level at your leisure. You can learn a thing in school and immediately apply it. Sure the school will have a lab, but I can't stress how much more you learn dicking around on a Sunday afternoon compared to trying to extract it from a book and lecture notes. Plus, you get to let the magic smoke out every once in awhile!

I'm wrapping up a BSEET degree, which isn't nearly as in depth as what you're going for, and I wish I would have done this at the outset. Equipment can be expensive, but these days you can get a pretty good setup for under $1000, and of reasonable quality too.

Also this book is the gold standard EE reference. You'll certainly want it on your shelf.