Astonishing X-Men, Vol. 1: Gifted

Author: Joss Whedon, John Cassaday
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Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10
by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

First, thanks so much for putting effort into your request for recommendations post. Providing preferences and ratings like that really helps.

> Im a fairly new comic reader

> Batman: Hush 9/10

> The Dark Knight Returns 4/10

Everything checks out here, lol. Obviously, everyone has different tastes, but I think you'd be surprised how often these scores swap after new readers revisit these stories years later.

Even if you didn't like Miller's DKR, you should still try his Batman: Year One.

On to recommendations:

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

Or any of the Valiant 2012 superhero universe reboot comics like Bloodshot, X-O Manowar, or:

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Flash

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

TPB or hardcover? Put it on a shelf and dust it periodically. Single/floppy? Bag + board.

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Batman (modern essentials)

X-Men (modern essentials)

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store
by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Forget about continuity, universes, timelines, etc; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Don’t try to read everything, else you'll be wading through decades of mediocre comics for far too long. Remember, there are so many other great characters/stories/publishers to explore.

First appearances/origins are not always good starting points. Creative teams change often and characters get re-worked e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Fraction & Aja’s interpretation. Focus on well-received and relatively self-contained stories. Pick an interesting character or team and seek their “greatest hits” stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character, but just try to ride along or Wiki if you must.

Marvel Unlimited / Comixology for digital. instocktrades for physical (US). ISBNS for price aggregate.

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Title Writer Note
Alias (Jessica Jones) Bendis
Ultimates 1 & 2 (Avengers) Mark Millar Ultimate
Avengers / New Avengers Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2
Captain America Ed Brubaker
Captain Marvel Kelly Sue DeConnick
Daredevil (1979) Frank Miller Daredevil 1
Daredevil Bendis Daredevil 2
Doctor Strange: The Oath Brian K. Vaughn
Fantastic Four / FF Jonathan Hickman Hickman 1
Hawkeye Matt Fraction
Immortal Iron Fist Brubaker & Fraction
Inhumans Paul Jenkins
Iron Man: Extremis Warren Ellis Iron Man 1
Invincible Iron Man Matt Fraction Iron Man 2
Marvels (Marvel History) Kurt Busiek READ FIRST
Moon Knight Warren Ellis
Ms. Marvel G. Willow Wilson
Planet Hulk Greg Pack Hulk 1
Punisher Max Garth Ennis
Thor Jason Aaron
Ultimate Spider-man Bendis Ultimate
Vision Tom King
New X-Men Grant Morrison X-Men 1
Astonishing X-Men Joss Whedon X-Men 2
Uncanny X-Force Rick Remender X-Men 6

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Title Writer Note
Avengers Disassembled Bendis
Secret War Bendis
House of M Bendis X-Men 2.5
Annihilation Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic
Civil War Mark Millar
World War Hulk Greg Pak Hulk 2
Annihilation: Conquest Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic
Messiah Complex Brubaker, Kyle, Yost, et al. X-Men 3
Secret Invasion Bendis Dark Reign
War Abnett, Lanning, et al. Cosmic
Messiah War Kyle, Yost, Swierczynski X-Men 4
Dark Avengers / Utopia Bendis, Fraction, et al. Dark Reign
Siege Bendis Dark Reign
Realm of Kings Abnett, Lanning, Reed Cosmic
Second Coming Kyle, Yost, Fraction, et al. X-Men 5
Fear Itself Matt Fraction
Schism Jason Aaron, Kieron Gillen X-Men 7
Avengers vs. X-Men Bendis, Brubaker, et al. X-Men 8
Infinity Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2.5
Secret Wars Jonathan Hickman Hickman 3

Discover your preferences and let them inform your next comic selection. Do you like older/newer comics? Weird concepts? Super-smart meta-analysis and social commentary? Family-friendly content? Hyper-violence? Male/female protagonists? Humor? Horror? Have you noticed that a specific artist, writer, and/or creative team consistently produces content you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve the list are welcome.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite stories/characters from TV, movies, games, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? What time/resources are available i.e. how many comics could/should be read before burning out?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about “catching up”, continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Don’t get stuck “preparing”, just start reading. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, Hoopla (free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Recommendations:

MARVEL

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

DC

Modern DC characters/teams:

Alternatively, you can skip to the recent Rebirth re-launch by reading the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Modern DC events/crossovers:

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Family-friendly/explicit content? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

> holistic read of the Marvel universe hitting on most of the major events

Just to put this into perspective for you, the Marvel superhero universe started as far back as the early 1960's (even the 1940's if you count other stuff). At an (average) publishing rate of 60 comics every month, that's over 40k of 10-minute, earth-616 comics to consider (and 20+ years of reading in your free time). There are different ways to approach it, and everyone has a different idea about which events are necessary/required/essential/important, but distilling that much Marvel history into a perfectly neat Reddit comment is nearly impossible.

You need to decide pretty early on what you're primarily getting into comics for: (1) reading for enjoyment or (2) encyclopedic Marvel continuity knowledge. If you care more about the latter, then I'd just skip the comics altogether because it'd take too long putting the pieces together that way. Wikipedia/timeline/chronology summaries, character bios, etc. get you that information much quicker (and it'd still take a while). If you favor the former, I'd suggest starting with modern stories and even considering non-616 since they are usually much easier to get into for new readers (alternate universe = fresh starting point without all the historical baggage). Keep in mind, if you're a Marvel fan, you've probably seen the MCU movies and you've probably enjoyed them. Those aren't 616 continuity. Those are a separate non-616 universe telling their own stories.

Here's my usual new reader advice:

 


Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


 

Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome.

Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info. I'm the author so let me know if you have questions or something seems confusing.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

You're probably used to Book 1, 2, 3, etc. Superhero comics are part of a decades-old shared-universe with multiple interconnected series. A unique/convoluted system of organizing all of that is just par for the course (nobody else has attempted storytelling like this).

There is no definitive reading order for ALL 40k+ Marvel comics released since the 1960s, nor is reading all of that even recommended. Instead, most suggest reading just one part of the universe at a time, usually something character-focused and modern.

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? At ~10 minutes and ~$2 per comic, will you read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained and complete stories—just one corner of the universe at a time. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events, just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt your favorite smaller stories and mess up characterization. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

> He buys weekly comics digitally on the marvel website

Make sure you look into Marvel Unlimited ($10/month, $70/year for everything but newest 6 months)

> He wants to own the essential stories of Marvel?

It's really difficult to categorize specific story arcs as "essential". You have to provide additional parameters like "all movie-related comics", "classic (pre-1980s) comics" or "essential event/crossover comics", otherwise, everyone will have a different definition, a different list, and ALL of them are going to be very extensive.

Here's an example of a Modern Essentials Events/Crossovers list. Note: There are no "solo" character series here so you are missing a lot of the context. Depending on your reading preferences, that might still be OK or you might feel compelled to check out everything in the "Reading Order" visual guides.

If you're more interested in understanding Marvel's history/continuity, then I recommend just reading wiki summaries—it'll catch you up much faster than reading thousands of comics. While not necessarily mutually exclusive, if you're reading primarily for enjoyment of the story (quality writing/art), then I suggest picking a character/team that seems interesting and seeking their "greatest hits".

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations