A Tour of C++ (C++ In-Depth)

Author: Bjarne Stroustrup
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A Tour of C++ (C++ In-Depth)

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by krat0sprakhar   2018-10-11
I'm not sure how C++ for DL is different from regular C++ so take my advice with a grain of salt.

I took a class under Bjarne Stroustrup and he highly recommended Tour of C++ [0] as the best way to learn modern C++ for someone who already has some programming experience. That and of course, Effective C++[1] by Scott Meyers.

[0] - https://www.amazon.com/Tour-C-Depth/dp/0321958314

[1] - https://www.amazon.com/Effective-Specific-Improve-Programs-D...

by dman   2018-01-20
Get this - https://www.amazon.com/Tour-C-Depth/dp/0321958314. If you are stuck at any point ask on /r/cpp, people there are very friendly and knowledgeable.
by parasight   2017-12-09
I'd recommend to choose one of these two books:

Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++, 2nd Ed., Bjarne Stroustrup https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Principles-Practice-Using...

C++ Primer, 5th Ed., Stanley Lippman https://www.amazon.com/Primer-5th-Stanley-B-Lippman/dp/03217...

For a very brief introduction:

A Tour of C++, Bjarne Stroustrup https://www.amazon.com/Tour-C-Depth/dp/0321958314/ref=sr_1_1...

by strangecasts   2017-11-14
I think C can be a good introductory language, but it should definitely be coupled with a CS textbook so you understand why C offers the things it does.

I definitely agree that C++ should be picked up later, though. Stroustrup's A Tour of C++ - https://www.amazon.com/Tour-C-Depth/dp/0321958314 - is a good introduction, I think.

by pmelendez   2017-08-19
As other said, Meyer's book is highly recommended.

Also, this talk would give you a very general overview of the new features of the language:

by dmunoz   2017-08-19
You're asking more specific questions that what I will cover, and they're good ones. It will be interesting to read how others reply.

For the other people looking, Stroustrup's A Tour of C++ [0] is the guide for getting quickly up to date with the "new C++", C++11 and onwards. It doesn't specifically cover C++14, but if you understand C++11, the few things coming in C++14 are for the most part minor enhancements to what is in C++11.

Scott Meyers should finish up the C++11/14 version of the Effective C++ series this year, and many are waiting for this. For now, his notes Overview of the New C++ (C++11/14) [1] are available for purchase.

If you like videos, there is a wealth of information from last years GoingNative conference [2]. More recently, at this years Build conferece, Herb Sutter gave a presentation on Modern C++: What You Need to Know [3].

Finally, come visit up over on reddit in /r/cpp [4]. Some heavyweights in the C++ world participate there, and the larger portion of participants are similarly knowledgeable in C++ as a whole.

[0] http://www.amazon.com/Tour-In-Depth-Series-Bjarne-Stroustrup...

[1] http://www.aristeia.com/Licensing/personalUse.html

[2] http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/2013?direction=a...

[3] http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2014/2-661

[4] http://www.reddit.com/r/cpp

by aurelian15   2017-08-19
C++ - "A tour of C++"

http://www.amazon.com/Tour-C--Depth/dp/0321958314

I read this book after having programmed C++ with the common "C++ is C with classes" attitude for a while, and it really made me change the way I looked at this language.

It was the book that made me realize how beautiful the RAII idiom is, that the STL was clearly not hacked together by a bunch of crazy monkeys, that you rarely need raw pointers in your code and that -- in contrast to popular belief -- you seldom need to care about memory management.

When I finished that book, and though in the full knowledge that I was dealing with this ugly monster of the Frankenstein kind; just like at the end of "the beauty and the beast", I had somehow come to respect and appreciate that language.