Superior Spider-Man, Vol. 1: My Own Worst Enemy

Category: Graphic Novels
Author: Dan Slott
4.5
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Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

   Modern Essentials

      Ultimate Spider-Man | #1-160 | 2000-2008 | Bendis

  • Self-contained Ultimate universe where new readers can start with the very first issue and not miss anything. Hits on all major teenage Spider-Man story beats, friends, and villains. Considered one of the best modern Spider-Man runs of all time.

      Spider-Man: Blue | #1-6 | 2002 | Loeb

  • Short, beautiful, touching, heart-warming story about a young Peter Parker torn between two romantic interests and maturing emotionally. Only 6 issues = a low-commitment peek at the character for new readers.

      Amazing Spider-Man | #30-57, 500-545 | 2001-2007 | Straczynski

  • JMS' run is well-regarded for making Peter Parker and "average guy" again, just trying to pay rent and survive adulthood. It's dark, funny, dramatic, well-paced, and introduces new status quo/mythos, even supernatural elements.

      Amazing Spider-Man (Brand New Day) | #546-647 | 2008-2010 | Slott, et al.

  • A fresh start for Peter Parker after Civil War. His memory has been reset and everything is new/different. He's back to his roots: struggling to pay rent, learning how the world works, and fighting his rogue gallery. Closest thing to a "reboot" Amazing Spider-Man has ever had = new reader friendly.

      Amazing Spider-Man (Big Time) | #648-700.5 | 2010-2013 | Slott, et al.

  • Peter Parker is back in his groove, he's leading the Avengers, has a new girlfriend, and landed a major career opportunity. This eventually sets up one of the coolest modern Spidey stories in Superior Spider-Man below.

      Superior Spider-Man | #1-33 | 2013-2014 | Slott, et al.

  • An impostor takes over for Spider-Man. Very different from the usual Spider-Man characterization = refreshing.
by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

I recommend giving the Marvel Comics Guide over at /r/Marvel a visit.

> I started with the series ‘Avengers Disassembled’ because it was the main suggestion for a jumping in point for everything that came out post-2000 basically. So what I’m trying to ask is, where do I go from here?

> Hawkeye

> Thor

> Iron Man

> Jessica Jones

> Spider-Man

> Deadpool

> Wolverine

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

   Modern Essentials

      Ultimate Spider-Man | #1-160 | 2000-2008 | Bendis

  • Self-contained Ultimate universe where new readers can start with the very first issue and not miss anything. Hits on all major teenage Spider-Man story beats, friends, and villains. Considered one of the best modern Spider-Man runs of all time.

      Spider-Man: Blue | #1-6 | 2002 | Loeb

  • Short, beautiful, touching, heart-warming story about a young Peter Parker torn between two romantic interests and maturing emotionally. Only 6 issues = a low-commitment peek at the character for new readers.

      Amazing Spider-Man | #30-57, 500-545 | 2001-2007 | Straczynski

  • JMS' run is well-regarded for making Peter Parker and "average guy" again, just trying to pay rent and survive adulthood. It's dark, funny, dramatic, well-paced, and introduces new status quo/mythos, even supernatural elements.

      Amazing Spider-Man (Brand New Day) | #546-647 | 2008-2010 | Slott, et al.

  • A fresh start for Peter Parker after Civil War. His memory has been reset and everything is new/different. He's back to his roots: struggling to pay rent, learning how the world works, and fighting his rogue gallery. Closest thing to a "reboot" Amazing Spider-Man has ever had = new reader friendly.

      Amazing Spider-Man (Big Time) | #648-700.5 | 2010-2013 | Slott, et al.

  • Peter Parker is back in his groove, he's leading the Avengers, has a new girlfriend, and landed a major career opportunity. This eventually sets up one of the coolest modern Spidey stories in Superior Spider-Man below.

      Superior Spider-Man | #1-33 | 2013-2014 | Slott, et al.

  • An impostor takes over for Spider-Man. Very different from the usual Spider-Man characterization = refreshing.
by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> I could just pick up a n52 issue 0 or 1 and feel confident that I wasnt missing out on lore or events (for most characters)

Well, that's just a matter of perspective, right? You DID miss out on lore/events that happened before and give context to all the changes that were made in New 52 (post-Crisis + Flashpoint). Some highly celebrated runs like Morrison's Batman and Johns' Green Lantern started BEFORE New 52. If you're reading superhero comics by "era" (e.g. Marvel NOW!, Marvel Now 2.0, Dark Reign, Bendis event era, All-New All-Different, etc.), then you just have to find a reading order.

Personally, I recommend being a little more "loose" in how you read i.e. reading by "mood" instead, regardless of publication date or era. Start with self-contained, recommended starting points and just read, read, read.

> For example lets say I'm interested in Spiderman

Here's my usual new Marvel comic reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Avoid over-analyzing—just start reading. Do you prefer old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Character/plot -driven story? Explicit content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t get a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> Where should I even begin to get caught up?

As a "DC guy" (assuming that means you still read DC comics), you should already understand that getting "caught up" in large superhero universes isn't really a short-term or low-commitment goal. Are you more interested in reading for enjoyment (quality storytelling) or gathering encyclopedic Marvel universe knowledge (major plot points, status quo changes, etc.)? They don't have to be mutually exclusive, but it's far more efficient to read wiki summaries and bios for the latter. I'd recommend focusing on popular/acclaimed titles over figuring out "what they've been doing for the past 20-25 years". Keep in mind: there's a lot of good stuff and only so much free time.

If you're familiar with Golden - Bronze Age comics from DC, and you like them, then go ahead and revisit some Marvel classics like (Marvel Unliimited links included):

Otherwise, I'd recommend some more "modern" essentials:

Iron Fist

Iron Man

Spider-Man

Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Each link is just the first volume a.k.a. a "starting point". Continue reading each subsequent volume until it isn't interesting anymore (hopefully it all is). Then, just go to the next starting point. NOTE: Spider-Man Blue is just one volume total.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about stories/characters from TV, movies, games, etc. that you already like. Do you seek “good” storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Are you here to collect or read? How much time/resources are available?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Recommendations:

Hulk

Iron Man

Spider-Man

Thanos

Thor

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Check out the /r/Marvel sidebar for more.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Literary/natural narratives? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Social/political commentary? Family-friendly/explicit content? Optimism/pessimism? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome.

by Tigertemprr   2017-08-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite stories/characters from TV, movies, games, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? What time/resources are available i.e. how many comics could/should be read before burning out?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about “catching up”, continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Don’t get stuck “preparing” to read comics—just start reading. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Recommendations:

Avengers

Iron Man

Spider-Man

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Check out the /r/Marvel sidebar for more.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Literary/natural narratives? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Social/political commentary? Family-friendly/explicit content? Optimism/pessimism? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome.