Immortal Iron Fist: The Complete Collection Volume 1

Category: Graphic Novels
Author: Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction, David Aja
4.7
All Reddit 133
This Year Reddit 185
This Month Reddit 19

About This Book

Experience a brand-new kind of Iron Fist story, one steeped in legends and fables stretching back through the centuries! Orphaned as a child and raised in the lost city of K'un-Lun, Danny Rand returned to America as the mystical martial artist Iron Fist - but all his kung fu skills can't help him find his place in the modern world.

After learning that the legacy of the Iron Fist holds more secrets than he ever dreamed, Danny is invited to fight in a tournament against the Immortal Weapons. At stake is the life of his friend, the legacy of his father and mentor...and the future of K'un-Lun!

Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

I'll let others recommend current series. Here's some good stuff to start with:

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by mogar01   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

You can skip to the 2016 re-launch with DC Universe: Rebirth and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> Where should I even begin to get caught up?

As a "DC guy" (assuming that means you still read DC comics), you should already understand that getting "caught up" in large superhero universes isn't really a short-term or low-commitment goal. Are you more interested in reading for enjoyment (quality storytelling) or gathering encyclopedic Marvel universe knowledge (major plot points, status quo changes, etc.)? They don't have to be mutually exclusive, but it's far more efficient to read wiki summaries and bios for the latter. I'd recommend focusing on popular/acclaimed titles over figuring out "what they've been doing for the past 20-25 years". Keep in mind: there's a lot of good stuff and only so much free time.

If you're familiar with Golden - Bronze Age comics from DC, and you like them, then go ahead and revisit some Marvel classics like (Marvel Unliimited links included):

Otherwise, I'd recommend some more "modern" essentials:

Iron Fist

Iron Man

Spider-Man

Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Here is some information from the FAQ:

Daredevil - Modern Essentials

Iron Fist - Modern Essentials

If you just read each entry from top to bottom then you should be fine. There are even years listed so you can see how they roughly fit in with each other. The FAQ focuses more on trades/runs (easier for new readers, imo) than per-issue reading orders (sometimes listed too).

Does that clear things up? What would you have liked to see in the FAQ instead?

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

"Vol" has 2 meanings. The first has to do with renumbers. Here's a Daredevil example:

Daredevil issues #1–380 (1964-1998) are considered "Volume 1".

Marvel decides (for various reasons) to restart the numbering for the Daredevil series and instead of calling the next comic #381, they call it #1 which marks the beginning of "Volume 2" of Daredevil.

Daredevil issues #1-119 (1998-2009) are considered "Volume 2". If they didn't start a "Volume 2" renumbering, then #1-119 would have been #381-499. Marvel decided to go back to the old numbering after #119 with #500-512 (2009-2010) which is still considered "Volume 2". "Volume 3" began when Marvel decided to renumber again, starting with #1-36, etc. (2011-2014). Essentially, when Marvel renumbers a series starting with #1, a new "Volume" begins.

The second meaning of "Volume" involves the actual printed collections sold at retail stores:

If you wanted to buy Frank Miller's acclaimed Daredevil comics, then you'd find DAREDEVIL BY FRANK MILLER & KLAUS JANSON VOL. 1 . Note there are 3 books in that set so "Volume" just refers to a specific book. Technically, you can buy Volume 1 of a Daredevil by Frank Miller paperback book set that contains Daredevil (Volume 1) issues #158-162, 163-172. Confusing? Don't worry, we all hate this.

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

X-Men - Modern Essentials

X-Men - Classics

General

Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Forget about continuity, universes, timelines, etc; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans.

First appearances & early origins are not always good starting points—older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences. Focus on well-received and relatively self-contained stories. Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary).

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Title Writer Note
Alias (Jessica Jones) Bendis
Ultimates 1 & 2 (Avengers) Mark Millar Ultimate
Avengers / New Avengers Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2
Captain America Ed Brubaker
Captain Marvel Kelly Sue DeConnick
Daredevil (1979) Frank Miller Daredevil 1
Daredevil Bendis Daredevil 2
Doctor Strange: The Oath Brian K. Vaughn
Fantastic Four / FF Jonathan Hickman Hickman 1
Hawkeye Matt Fraction
Immortal Iron Fist Brubaker & Fraction
Inhumans Paul Jenkins
Iron Man: Extremis Warren Ellis Iron Man 1
Invincible Iron Man Matt Fraction Iron Man 2
Marvels (Marvel History) Kurt Busiek
Moon Knight Warren Ellis
Ms. Marvel G. Willow Wilson
Planet Hulk Greg Pack Hulk 1
Punisher Max Garth Ennis
Thor Jason Aaron
Ultimate Spider-man Bendis Ultimate
Vision Tom King
New X-Men Grant Morrison X-Men 1
Astonishing X-Men Joss Whedon X-Men 2
Uncanny X-Force Rick Remender X-Men 6

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Title Writer Note
Avengers Disassembled Bendis
Secret War Bendis
House of M Bendis X-Men 2.5
Annihilation Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic
Civil War Mark Millar
World War Hulk Greg Pak Hulk 2
Annihilation: Conquest Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic
Messiah Complex Brubaker, Kyle, Yost, et al. X-Men 3
Secret Invasion Bendis Dark Reign
War Abnett, Lanning, et al. Cosmic
Messiah War Kyle, Yost, Swierczynski X-Men 4
Dark Avengers / Utopia Bendis, Fraction, et al. Dark Reign
Siege Bendis Dark Reign
Realm of Kings Abnett, Lanning, Reed Cosmic
Second Coming Kyle, Yost, Fraction, et al. X-Men 5
Fear Itself Matt Fraction
Schism Jason Aaron, Kieron Gillen X-Men 7
Avengers vs. X-Men Bendis, Brubaker, et al. X-Men 8
Infinity Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2.5
Secret Wars Jonathan Hickman Hickman 3

Modern DC characters/teams:

Title Writer
Animal Man Grant Morrison
Animal Man Jeff Lemire
Aquaman Geoff Johns
Batman: Year One Frank Miller
Batman: Dark Knight Returns Frank Miller
Batman: The Long Halloween Jeph Loeb
Batman: Hush Jeph Loeb
Batman Scott Snyder
Batwoman: Elegy Greg Rucka
Birds of Prey Gail Simone
Flash Mark Waid
Flash Geoff Johns
Gotham Central Brubaker & Rucka
Green Arrow Kevin Smith
Green Arrow Jeff Lemire
Green Lantern Geoff Johns
JLA (Justice League) Morrison & Waid
Kingdom Come Mark Waid
Omega Men Tom King
Suicide Squad John Ostrander
Secret Six (Suicide Squad) Gail Simone
Superman: Birthright Mark Waid
Superman: American Alien Max Landis
Superman: All-Star Superman Grant Morrison
Swamp Thing Alan Moore
Swamp Thing Scott Snyder
New Teen Titans Marv Wolfman
Wonder Woman Greg Rucka
Wonder Woman Brian Azzarello

Modern DC events/crossovers:

Title Writer
Crisis on Infinite Earths Marv Wolfman
Identity Crisis Brad Meltzer
Infinite Crisis Geoff Johns
52 Geoff Johns, et al.
Final Crisis Grant Morrison
Blackest Night Geoff Johns
Flashpoint Geoff Johns
Forever Evil Geoff Johns
Multiversity, The Grant Morrison
Darkseid War Geoff Johns
Rebirth Geoff Johns
by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Starter Recommendations

Wolverine

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. There are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's easier to focus on one part of the universe, like solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing—just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo for all but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, there are "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

You're probably used to Book 1, 2, 3, etc. Superhero comics are part of a decades-old shared-universe with multiple interconnected series. A unique/convoluted system of organizing all of that is just par for the course (nobody else has attempted storytelling like this).

There is no definitive reading order for ALL 40k+ Marvel comics released since the 1960s, nor is reading all of that even recommended. Instead, most suggest reading just one part of the universe at a time, usually something character-focused and modern.

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? At ~10 minutes and ~$2 per comic, will you read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained and complete stories—just one corner of the universe at a time. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events, just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt your favorite smaller stories and mess up characterization. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics (US, see bookdepository for international):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

Marvel

DC

You can skip to the 2016 Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

DC-Vertigo/Wildstorm (standalone, mature reader):