Extremis (Iron Man)

Category: Graphic Novels
Author: Warren Ellis
4.2
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Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

   Iron Man: Extremis | #1-6 | 2005 | Ellis

  • In this redefined Iron Man techno-thriller action story, the Extremis chemical can imbue people with volatile superpowers while Tony Stark is accused of being an irresponsible arms dealer. When an old friend asks him for help, Tony attempts to unravel the Extremis mystery which proves dangerous, challenging, and potentially beneficial as a means for a major Iron Man suit upgrade.

   Invincible Iron Man | #1-33, 500-527 | 2008-2012 | Fraction

  • In this celebrated modern run, the billionaire genius playboy with new Extremis Iron Man suit is targeted by international terrorists, tries to protect superhero identities before losing all brain function, loses his fortune/fame, prevents his technology from being misused, struggles with alcoholism, repels foreign invaders, and ultimately attempts to rebuild his life and forge a better future.
by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Well, you didn't really give us much to work with. What are your favorite movies, TV shows, comics (if you've already read some), books, games, etc.? In lieu of that answer, here are some general recommendations:

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> I could just pick up a n52 issue 0 or 1 and feel confident that I wasnt missing out on lore or events (for most characters)

Well, that's just a matter of perspective, right? You DID miss out on lore/events that happened before and give context to all the changes that were made in New 52 (post-Crisis + Flashpoint). Some highly celebrated runs like Morrison's Batman and Johns' Green Lantern started BEFORE New 52. If you're reading superhero comics by "era" (e.g. Marvel NOW!, Marvel Now 2.0, Dark Reign, Bendis event era, All-New All-Different, etc.), then you just have to find a reading order.

Personally, I recommend being a little more "loose" in how you read i.e. reading by "mood" instead, regardless of publication date or era. Start with self-contained, recommended starting points and just read, read, read.

> For example lets say I'm interested in Spiderman

Here's my usual new Marvel comic reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Avoid over-analyzing—just start reading. Do you prefer old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Character/plot -driven story? Explicit content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t get a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

 


Quick Picks

Modern Characters/Teams (1994+):

This information came from the Marvel Comics Guide in the sidebar "New to Marvel Comics?".

Let me know if you have anymore questions.

Suggestions to improve this content are welcome.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite stories/characters from TV, movies, games, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How much time/resources are available i.e. how deep do you want to dive?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about “catching up”, continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Don’t get stuck “preparing”, just start reading. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, e-library (e.g. Hoopla - free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They're most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best comics integrate events seamlessly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Modern DC characters/teams:

Alternatively, you can skip to the Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Modern DC events/crossovers:

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Family-friendly/explicit content? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

   Moon Knight

   Spider-Man

   General

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. There are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's easier to focus on one part of the universe, like solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing—just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo for all but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

> Any tips on how to get into comics without spending too much money?

Buy used via /r/comicswap, ebay, halfpricebooks, etc.

Check out physical and digital library services.

Subscribe to unlimited reading services like Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months).

> trying to get myself into comics and man it is intimidating. All the different heroes with different story lines and sometimes multiple comics for the same heroes in print at once.

It seems intimidating because you're trying to understand ALL OF IT at once. As soon as you start reading ONE comic, you become immersed/invested in ONE story which is much easier to grasp. All the continuity/shared-universe stuff creeps in via references and details.

My advice: find some recommended starter titles or "Top Comics of all time" list entries and just START READING. Keep your head down and follow one series at a time. Let the rest come together gradually and organically—like solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time until there's enough to see the big picture.

"Starter" titles to keep you going:

Marvel

DC

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

> He buys weekly comics digitally on the marvel website

Make sure you look into Marvel Unlimited ($10/month, $70/year for everything but newest 6 months)

> He wants to own the essential stories of Marvel?

It's really difficult to categorize specific story arcs as "essential". You have to provide additional parameters like "all movie-related comics", "classic (pre-1980s) comics" or "essential event/crossover comics", otherwise, everyone will have a different definition, a different list, and ALL of them are going to be very extensive.

Here's an example of a Modern Essentials Events/Crossovers list. Note: There are no "solo" character series here so you are missing a lot of the context. Depending on your reading preferences, that might still be OK or you might feel compelled to check out everything in the "Reading Order" visual guides.

If you're more interested in understanding Marvel's history/continuity, then I recommend just reading wiki summaries—it'll catch you up much faster than reading thousands of comics. While not necessarily mutually exclusive, if you're reading primarily for enjoyment of the story (quality writing/art), then I suggest picking a character/team that seems interesting and seeking their "greatest hits".

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

This list is more "new reader" than "must read" but still some greatest hits for each character/team. Note: Some "must read" comics aren't completely new reader friendly i.e. sometimes they require more Marvel knowledge or reading prior runs to fully appreciate. Marvel Unlimited links included.