Forging Divinity (The War of Broken Mirrors)

Author: Andrew Rowe
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About This Book

Sorcerers in my Forging Divinity (and my other War of Broken Mirrors novels) tend to have roughly one to three Dominions they can work with, and each Dominion has an associated cost. A flame sorcerer can call on the Dominion of Flame to conjure fire, but at the cost of body heat. A water sorcerer can conjure water, but it dehydrates them.

Some magic types are more esoteric, and sorcerers also specialize in either calling (conjuring energy or matter from the Dominion) or shaping (manipulating existing matter/energy).

Some say that in the city of Orlyn, godhood is on sale to the highest bidder. Thousands flock to the city each year, hoping for a chance at immortality. Lydia Hastings is a knowledge sorcerer, capable of extracting information from anything she touches. When she travels to Orlyn to validate the claims of the local faith, she discovers a conspiracy that could lead to a war between the world's three greatest powers.

At the focal point is a prisoner who bears a striking resemblance to the long-missing leader of the pantheon she worships. Rescuing the prisoner would require risking her carefully cultivated cover - but his execution could mean the end of everything Lydia holds dear.

Comments

by Salaris   2017-08-19

If you like Weeks and Sanderson, I've got some other recommendations for books with heavy magic systems!

Mother of Learning is about a novice mage who gets stuck in a month-long time loop. The magic system is something of a mix between D&Dish schools of magic and anime-style training exercises. We learn more about the magic system as the protagonist does. Lots of fun twists on the genre in there, too.

Worm is a web serial about a young girl who wants to be come a super hero - but, unfortunately, her powers and her first encounter make her look like a villain instead. Unlike many super hero stories, the powers are well-explained and several characters use them cleverly.

Unsouled is the first novel in Will Wight's Crucible series, which blends heavy magic system development with martial arts. (It's similar to Wuxia/Xianxia books or films, if you're familiar with those.) If you want something heavy on the action side, I'd recommend going with this.

Forging Divinity is one of my own books, and it's definitely heavy on the magic side.

Sorcerers in my Forging Divinity (and my other War of Broken Mirrors novels) tend to have roughly one to three Dominions they can work with, and each Dominion has an associated cost. A flame sorcerer can call on the Dominion of Flame to conjure fire, but at the cost of body heat. A water sorcerer can conjure water, but it dehydrates them.

Some magic types are more esoteric, and sorcerers also specialize in either calling (conjuring energy or matter from the Dominion) or shaping (manipulating existing matter/energy).

For example, Taelien in the first book is a metalshaper; he can modify the properties of existing metallic objects, but he can't conjure any significant amount of new metal, and he can only alter metal he's touching (either directly or through another metal object that he's holding). He uses this to make himself a prodigious swordsman; he can reshape his own weapon, shift the structure of his weapon mid-swing, create flaws in enemy weapons, etc.

If this type of thing interests you, you might want to take a look at my own books - but fair warning that it takes several chapters to warm up.

by Salaris   2017-08-19

Hiya!

I'm Andrew. I write "hard fantasy", meaning I have a strong emphasis on making sure the world is largely rational and internally consistent. Similarly, I tend to write "hard magic" systems with clear rules and limitations. I have two books out - the first is Forging Divinity .

I have some LGBT characters, but that fact hasn't really come up as relevant in the text yet - my books don't tend to have a strong focus on romance or sexuality at the moment. It'll be addressed when it's relevant. My books do include POC, but not enough of them to be accurately representative of the setting's demographics, so that's something I'll be addressing more in the future.

by Salaris   2017-08-19

Sounds like you have similar tastes to my own.

Some recommendations:

House of Blades is the first novel in Will Wight's Traveler's Gate Trilogy. It's very heavy on action and character progression, very much like a shonen anime in book form. If you liked Kaladin's arc in the Stormlight Archives, I'd recommend this.

Mother of Learning is about a novice mage who gets stuck in a month-long time loop. The magic system is something of a mix between D&Dish schools of magic and anime-style training exercises. We learn more about the magic system as the protagonist does. Since you like both Name of the Wind and Sanderson's stuff, I think you'll like the magic here.

Worm is a web serial about a young girl who wants to be come a super hero - but, unfortunately, her powers and her first encounter make her look like a villain instead. If you've read Sanderson's Steelheart, I'd say this feels sort of similar, but I consider it generally superior. The character abilities are very clearly defined and individual characters often have cool powers and weaknesses.

Forging Divinity is one of my own books, and if you're interested with detailed magical rules and analytical characters, I'd recommend it. Fair warning that it takes a bit of time to warm up, though.