Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana

Author: Hans H. Orberg
4.0
This Month Reddit 6

Comments

by sukottoburaun   2019-11-17

I recommend Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, which teaches Latin entirely in Latin. There are online exercises and also a YouTube playlist of the book read aloud by u/LukeAmadeusRanieri if you want to hear what it sounds like.

by SmokyDragonDish   2019-11-17

Edit: I just read the rest of what you said and misunderstood. There are podcasts, ask about them in the Latin sub.

Check out /r/Latin.

Also, buy this: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata

by sukottoburaun   2019-11-17
  • Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata teaches Latin from scratch just using Latin. Everything is explained from pictures and context.
  • Vivarium Novum is an Italian website which has links to a lot of free Latin resources.
  • Archive has a lot of old Latin books.
by sukottoburaun   2019-08-24

Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana is quite good. It teaches Latin completely in Latin. There are online exercises for this at http://wyomingcatholic.net/WCCLatin.htm

by dephira   2019-08-24

Yes basically writing a text in German without any explanatory notes. It just came to my mind since your approach is so heavy on cognates so students should be able to understand a text made up of those cognates and half cognates.

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You can preview some pages of the book on Amazon, maybe it will help clarify what I mean: Amazon link

by sukottoburaun   2019-08-24

I think that Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana is the best way to start. It teaches Latin completely in Latin. There are online exercises for this at http://wyomingcatholic.net/WCCLatin.htm

by mhd   2018-02-08
I've always wanted to get into Latin, and my current plan is getting through "Lingua Latina"[1], a book written in Latin and heavily recommended by others.

I do wonder about a "global Latin community", though. My personal experience with Latin "speakers" has been tinged by an atmosphere of Elitism. Not just about knowing the language, but the whole curriculum of literature. A bit like when you're thrown into a club of people quoting Star Wars all the time, just a bit more high-falutin'. Comes with centuries of "classical education" being a hallmark of upper class schooling. Compare that with the basic concept of languages like Esperanto...

[1]: https://www.amazon.com/Lingua-Latina-Illustrata-Pars-Familia...