John Constantine, Hellblazer, Vol. 1: Original Sins

Category: Graphic Novels
Author: Jamie Delano, John Ridgway, Rick Veitch
4.1
All Reddit 67
This Year Reddit 95
This Month Reddit 10

Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

You can skip to the 2016 Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

DC Vertigo/Wildstorm (mature readers):

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by mogar01   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

You can skip to the 2016 re-launch with DC Universe: Rebirth and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

If you want to start with newer comics, then you can skip to the 2016 Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1. I'd recommend Nightwing and Batman.

Alternatively, if you're not super strict about the "new" comic thing, I'd actually recommend reading some older/popular/acclaimed comics like:

Since you mentioned Spawn and The Darkness (non-DC/Marvel), I also think you'd dig DC imprint comics (Vertigo/Wildstorm):

Did you mention "new comics" because you're more interested in the DC universe as a whole? Are you trying to stay up to date/current? IMO, DC's best comics are a little older and the smaller story arcs are much more digestible/serve as a better hook for readers new to DC in general.

Unfortunately, I didn't learn anything from "wide variety of movies and TV shows" so the list above will be pretty general (something similar to what you'd find in a Google search). If you can elaborate on why you liked those 4 comics, why don't like other comics you've tried, your top 5 stories from other media, etc., then we could provide much clearer direction. For example, if you enjoy movies like Star Wars or Guardians of the Galaxy, then Geoff Johns' Green Lantern would be a good fit. With the exception of Spider-Man, the comics you listed are relatively dark/edgy/90s flavor. Batman seems like the obvious recommendation for that.

by Dagda45   2018-11-10

Those thirty volumes or so are being replaced by ones that have the trade title "John Constantine: Hellblazer vol #." They are up to 19 thicker volumes released, with 229 issues recollected. /u/ohnoampz , if you want to read the original Hellblazer this wikipedia page is actually very good. It tells you the names and contents of the newer released trades, as well as the unnumbered ones that haven't been recollected.

Keep in mind that some names from both sets of volumes are the same, so be sure to grab the ones with the newer covers and the "John Constantine" name in front of it (for example, the first volume of both sets was called "Original Sins," but the newer one contains very important issues of Swamp Thing that were skipped before).

If you wish to start without the Alan Moore Swamp Thing issues, this would be the first one . I first read it without reading Swamp Thing, and everything made sense.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

TPB or hardcover? Put it on a shelf and dust it periodically. Single/floppy? Bag + board.

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

> The problem is I don't know where to start, every video/guide talks about picking the favorite character and read about it, but that's not what I want to hear

Why didn't you like the "pick your favorite character and read about it" advice? That's, imo, the best way to get into superhero comics.

> I concluded that there is different origin story for each character in each one of the events

What do you mean by "in each one of the events"? Every character's origin has been re-told MANY times. People will recommend a "best" origin, but it's not definitive, actually, it's very subjective. TBH, origin stories are kind of a new reader trap. They adhere to the beginning, middle, and end storytelling structure of "complete" self-contained stories people have come to expect from other entertainment mediums. Comics are decades-long ongoing stories. It's like a TV show with 100 seasons and every 40 seasons it get's "rebooted"—the characters are the same, but they have to find creative ways (e.g. time travel, multiverses) to change the actors/directors/writers out because they got too old/ran out of story ideas. How many times do you want to hear about Batman's parents dying before it gets EXTREMELY tiresome/boring?

Anyway, here's my copy/pasta for new readers (let me know if you have questions):

DC Starter Guide


How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite stories/characters from TV, movies, games, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? What time/resources are available i.e. how many comics (per character) could/should be read before burning out?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about “catching up”, continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Aquaman until Geoff Johns’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Don’t get stuck “preparing”, just start reading. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, e-library (e.g. Hoopla - free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Modern DC characters/teams:

Alternatively, you can skip to the recent Rebirth re-launch by reading the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1. /r/DCcomics sidebar for more info.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers already well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern DC events/crossovers:

DC also publishes varied-genre, creator-owned comics for “mature readers” under separate imprints (e.g. Vertigo):

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Literary/natural narratives? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Social/political commentary? Family-friendly/explicit content? Optimism/pessimism? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome.

EDIT: Added Jeff Parker run to Aquaman recommendation

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

Modern DC characters/teams:

Modern DC events/crossovers:

DC also publishes varied-genre, creator-owned comics for “mature readers” under separate imprints (e.g. Vertigo):

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Shared-universe, decades-long superhero comic series will weird if you're not ready for the changes in format. Manga typically starts at Volume 1 and you just pick up every volume after until it ends. While that still exists somewhat in western comics, be ready for multiple interconnected series that require you to hunt down specific issues or out of order volumes to get a "complete" story.

A quick note about Superman/Batman: it's fine to not like them or feel like you already know them, but I assure you there is more variety, quality, and rare gems left unexplored. "Knowing" the characters from TV or movies also doesn't have anything to do with the actual writing/art in the comics.

You mentioned a lot of superheroes, but, just like manga, there are much more genres than that. You might even prefer comics not made by Marvel/DC and outside the superhero genre. Like manga, you can start most of these at just volume 1 until a clear/definitive ending:

Vertigo/Wildstorm

Other publishers

For superheroes, it'd be easier to recommend if we know which characters interested you. Here's some Aquaman reading (Johns' run is particularly great):

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? At ~10 minutes and ~$2 per comic, can you read 50 (essentials) or 500 (comprehensive) comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained and complete stories—just one corner of the universe at a time. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events, just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt your favorite smaller stories and mess up characterization. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Comixology, e-library e.g. Hoopla (free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

Flash

General

You can skip to the 2016 Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

DC Vertigo/Wildstorm (mature readers):

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic DC knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers already well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt solo series and your favorite characters’ personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like old/new comics? Specific genres/writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Comixology, e-library e.g. Hoopla (free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

You can skip to the 2016 Rebirth re-launch with the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

DC Vertigo/Wildstorm:

by [deleted]   2017-08-19

You said that you would rather audiobooks over traditional reading, but what are your feelings on comic books?

There is a great fantasy comics series written in and set in the 1980's called John Constantine: Hellblazer . It is about a small-time conman from Liverpool with an unhealthy knowledge of magic, Heaven and Hell. He is left pretty mentally unstable as everyone he knows ends up dying.

Great series - I didn't really do it justice with my explanation. It is very unlike traditional Fantasy, so I think with you being so well versed in the genre you might appreciate it.

 

P.S. Looking at your list of authors I'm surprised there is no Tolkien. Could you not get into LotR?

by Tigertemprr   2017-08-19

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Modern DC characters/teams:

Alternatively, you can skip to the recent Rebirth re-launch by reading the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Modern DC events/crossovers:

DC also publishes varied-genre, creator-owned comics for “mature readers” under separate imprints (e.g. Vertigo):

Recommendations matching these criteria:

  • + superhero
  • - Marvel, DC

NOTE: Ratings are IRL reading group averages, subjective, rounded, in flux, and require 2+ opinions. " - " = unrated but worth mention.

Rating Title Creative Team Publisher Description
85 Harbinger Joshua Dysart & Lewis Larosa Valiant superhero team, renegades
85 Invincible Robert Kirkman & Walker, Ryan Ottley Image superhero, aliens, action, drama, family
85 Quantum & Woody James Asmus, et al. Valiant superhero team, comedy
80 Bloodshot Swierczynski & Lozzi, et al. Valiant superhero, man/machine, conspiracy, action, violence
75 Boys, The Garth Ennis Dynamite superhero deconstruction, dark, shock value
75 Irredeemable Mark Waid & Peter Krause Boom! superhero becomes supervillain
75 The Maxx Sam Keith, et al. IDW psychological, horror, fantasy, dark, sureal, superhero
75 Sword, The Joshua Luna & Jonathan Luna Image superhero, fantasy, action, tragedy, mythos
75 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Tom Waltz, Kevin Eastman, et al. IDW (see title), action, comedy, sci-fi, superhero
75 X-O Manowar Venditti & Hairsine, et al. Valiant superhero, sci-fi, action, aliens
70 Cape, The Joe Hill, J. Ciaramella & Zach Howard IDW superhero becomes villain
- Archer & Armstong Fred Van Lente & Henry, Perez, et al. Valiant superhero, action, comedy, mythos
- G. I. Joe Larry Hama, Chuck Dixon, et al. IDW superhero, action, military, spy
- Luthor Strode Justin Jordan & Tradd Moore Image horror, action, fighting, superhero
by Tigertemprr   2017-08-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, Hoopla (free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Recommendations:

MARVEL

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

DC

Modern DC characters/teams:

Alternatively, you can skip to the recent Rebirth re-launch by reading the DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Modern DC events/crossovers:

DC also publishes varied-genre, creator-owned comics for “mature readers” under separate imprints (e.g. Vertigo):