Player's Handbook (Dungeons & Dragons)

Category: Puzzles & Games
Author: Wizards RPG Team
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Comments

by JingJang   2019-08-24

Its not free but it's also not too expensive. The Players Handbook is where to start. It is $30: https://www.amazon.com/Players-Handbook-Dungeons-Dragons-Wizards/dp/0786965606/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=D%26D+5e+phb&qid=1557235185&s=gateway&sr=8-1

The best way to learn is from someone else. Do you have a game store nearby? That's the best best to find groups. if you can get in with a group that already knows the rules they'll help you understand how to play.

by Joepancreas   2019-08-24

Looks like they've added the Players Handbook, now showing as about 20 bucks!

​

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0786965606/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_x3TYCb6C4S62H

by booyah719   2019-08-24

https://www.amazon.com/Players-Handbook-Dungeons-Dragons-Wizards/dp/0786965606

by Kornstalx   2019-07-21

Jesus Christ, here:

https://www.amazon.com/Players-Handbook-Dungeons-Dragons-Wizards/dp/0786965606

by stevensydan   2019-07-21

I just ran my first session as a new DM with LMoP last week! I'll jot down my experience running a group of 4 beginners. (so take my advice with a grain of salt as a beginner that has not finished the campaign)


First, read through the books in the Starter Set! (If you can afford the Player's Handbook, that is a good idea as well.) I highly recommend going through the rulebook (or Basic Rules) then at least skimming through the entire LMoP module. You don't have to memorize everything but as a DM it is important to have the idea of the setting in your head.

For combat, you have to decide if you are going to run "Theater of the Mind" or battlemat+miniatures for combat. Theater of the Mind is more flexible and requires less preparation but battlemats give great visuals at a cost of preparation and supply.

Then you have to decide if you think your players would want to make their own characters or not. For my beginner group, I decided that they would be a lot more invested/excited if they could identify with their own creation so I chose to not use the pre-generated character sheets. Once you are comfortable with the rules of D&D enough, set a date to meet with your group.

Since we had to make characters, I held a Session 0 to introduce the basic concept of what to expect in committing to D&D as well as character creation. I highly suggest making characters together a separate day before Session 1 because it usually takes a decent amount of time for the first time (3ish hours for me).

My Session 0 looked like this:

  • Introduction to D&D

  • Explaining all races, classes, backgrounds and letting them pick

  • Giving character sheets, rolling stats

  • Guiding them through the char sheet by referencing DNDBeyond for background/race/class bonuses

After everyone was done, I let them take home the character sheet and work on character appearance, personality, and background story.

The week after, we had Session 1. Make sure you actually read through the LMoP module in depth, at least up to Part 1-2 beforehand. I also decided to take some elements of this supplement Part 0 for LMoP to use as a tutorial for my players. Then, begin your adventure! My party took a lot longer than I expected and only got to the entrance of the Cragmaw Hideout after 3 hours.

Good luck to your campaign, I'm looking forward to my second session!


Some recommended guides I used:

  • Matt Mercer tips (all DM's love this man)

  • Don't Stop Thinking guides (great graphic visuals and in-depth coverage)

  • Matt Colville tips (gives a good idea of how D&D should look like at an advanced level)

  • DungeonDudes (channel that covers good topics)

  • DNDBeyond (amazing website for the Basic Rules, classes, and races)

  • OneCritWonder LMoP tips (helpful overview of the module)

  • LMoP enemies (generator that adapts to how many players you have)


Supplies I personally prepared (BUT ARE OPTIONAL):

  • Beginner dice (shared with my beginners, they are planning to get their own sets soon)

  • Custom character sheets (a bit overwhelming at first but I find helpful for each class)

  • Spell cards (I don't think many people use these but I find it an amazing resource to give your players if they are spellcasters)

  • Battlemat (use with Wet-Erase markers)

  • Paper minis (dedication and time required, can use coins, legos, or anything instead or even real miniatures if you can afford it)

  • DM Screen (the official and most standard and affordable screen)

by SmootieFakk   2019-07-21

Uhhh, definitely not.

This is the one you're looking for.

by moxiousmissy   2019-07-21

/u/spidersam639 my daughter's birthday is coming up (May), she'll be turning 11 this year and wants to get into DnD. She's on the autism spectrum and I think this would be perfect for her to learn more about DnD and be a fun social activity for her since some of her friends are getting into it :)

Thanks for the contest! I hope you both had a great weekend!!

by Android8675   2019-07-21

What game do you want to play? I've been fairly active with a 5e Adventurers League group, came in as a newbie, now I'd say I'm an OK DM with a bunch of level 5-15 characters. Group is super newbie friendly, we play on Roll20.net + Discord, and you don't need a pay account to get started.

Links...

  • AL Hub, Discord - Click here to join our Discord server. (When you get in say hello in #general and then check out the #info-for-new-players channel.)
  • DMSGuild.com AL Info Pack for Players/DMs - Grab this free download, it has the Adventurers League Rules. You'll want to read the Forgotten Realms "ALPG" file first.
  • WotC Basic D&D Rules - This is a FREE PDF of the 5e rules, it's enough to get you started, but if you think you're gonna be playing a lot of 5e, check out the next link.
  • 5e Players Handbook - pretty much a must buy if you plan to play a lot. You can get by without it, but eventually you should get a physical copy for yourself.

Lots of information online, you can ask anything in general, and get positive responses. The basics are you make a character using the PHB (and optionally you may add the rules from ONE expansion rulebook like Xanathar's Guide to Everything), you have to use the "Point Buy" method when you select your stats (it's in the PHB), and you have to keep a log of what adventurers your character participates in. Oh and you have to start at level 1, no exceptions.

Hope that's enough to get you going. Maybe you were hoping to get a Starfinder group or something, but if you want to get into 5e, I hope to see you in Discord.

-A.

by ThunderousOath   2019-07-21

Alright so first thing is ask who you are playing with what edition they are playing. Likely, they are playing 5e. So you need a Player's Handbook.

It's roughly $30 and will cover most you need, classes, races, and spells, etc.

You don't need that to play, though. You can go to dndbeyond.com and download their app, and on that app you can download the basic rules for dnd 5e for free, which is then easily searchable and has all of the rules to playing the game, just not as many spells, races, and subclasses.

by Heyydin   2019-01-13

To my knowledge, please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think 5e is here for a while. I know there is a new version of Pathfinder in the works but I'm not too sure when.

I'm not sure where you were looking, but for all 3 core books it's not even $90.
r/https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0786965606

Also, for the DM, you would need the DMG first, PHB second, and MM third. Here are my reasons:

DMG - For learning tips on DMing 5e as well as being full of useful info to create adventures, this I would say get first.
PHB - Help see what spells your players have and what each class does. Helpful for you to learn more about 5e.
MM - While an AMAZING resource full of monsters, it can be a lot when you are picking what to initially throw at your characters. You can google most monsters and it'll help split the cost up.

As for that starter set: My players loved it. You, especially for your previous experience, could make the Starter set work for probably a few months. You can also find adventures for free or at low costs on dmsguild.com

by Rammite   2019-01-13

That's all you need to begin! It's got step by step instructions on how to play as a DM, or how to play as one of five pre-generated characters.

If you want to stretch your creative muscles, you'll need the Player's Handbook for all of the base rules, including all 12 classes and a full list of spells to pick from.

by Drebin295   2019-01-13

$29.97 on Amazon.

by Jaxom26   2018-11-10

I think I saw a post that the Players Handbook is on selling on Amazon for $20.00 normally $50.00.

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0786965606

by OneCritWonder   2018-11-10

Great news! You don't need to buy anything. You can play D&D as soon as you want without spending a dime.

  • You can grab the free Basic Rules PDF which has the core rules and basic character generation options.

  • You can watch tutorials like this video series. Combat episode is particularly helpful.

  • Read the Getting Started Guide in the /r/DND sidebar.


But even so, D&D 5th Edition is streamlined and easy to learn and there are tons of people willing to help teach you. Its not a game you need to sit and read the rules from cover to cover before playing, you can very much sit down to a table as totally fresh and learn by playing--I teach people this way all the time.

Consider checking out your local gaming store and see if they do any tutorials, have Organized Play, or know of groups looking for any members.

You can also use these resources:

> If you're looking to play in person:

> * Check in with your local gaming store.

> * Local board game/RPG Facebook Groups

> * Local board game/RPG Meetup Groups

> * Post in the subreddit for your town / area

> * Search /r/LFG for posts or make one.

> * LFG tools on Obsidian Portal and PenAndPaperGames > * Sites like FindGamers, NearbyGamers, GamerSeekingGamer

> * Check WarHorn for local postings

> If you're looking to play online:

> * /r/LFG and /r/Roll20LFG

> * Roll20's game finder and LFG forums

> * Fantasy Grounds has a LFG Forum

> * Play via Tabletop Simulator

> * RPG Discord servers: Dungeons & Downvotes, Pair O' Dice, etc...


If you end up just reading up on the rules and wanting to start your own group. I highly recommend the Starter Set .

It's $15 on Amazon, has the core rules, a set of dice, premade characters, and an adventure that will last you a half dozen sessions or so. It's a great place to start--go figure--and is designed for brand new players and brand new DMs. The adventure is laid out in a way that introduces concepts as you go along rather than expecting you to know everything up front.

The premade characters are big because you want to get straight to the playing not sit there explaining character creation to a brand new player. Without the context of how things are used, its just a wall of data and memorization... which isn't fun.

You can always bring custom characters in once the group gets to town or something if people want, and now they'll kinda know the ropes.


If you decide D&D is the hobby for you, your first purchase goal should be the Player's Handbook . Its the core rulebook with all of the default character options, spells, etc.

by Obi-Tron_Kenobi   2018-11-10

You can try getting a replacement from Wizards like the guy said below. If that doesn't work, the 5e Handbook is only $20.98 on Amazon now.

by Gentleman_Kendama   2018-11-10

It's on sale through Amazon .

$27.27

List Price: ~~$49.95~~

Save: $22.68 (45%)

by redworm   2018-11-10

The starter set for the current edition is $25: https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/B00SI774U6

Everything you need to run a game when everyone is new. Dice, pre-built characters for players to choose from, and a story for the Dungeon Master to run them through.

Alternatively you can buy the player's handbook and the dungeon master's guide individually:

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0786965606

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0786965622

and some dice

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/B01ABST9S4

With those you can do the same thing as the starter set but there's a whole lot more information available about all the different classes, races, weapons, combat rules, spells, etc. I'd recommend the starter set and if y'all are interested in going further getting the rest.

Set aside a few hours one evening to play a session. A lot of groups will do a shorter session 0 where they discuss what characters they're going to play and make sure they've got a decent grasp of the mechanics and rules.

In the course of about 2-3 hours you'll probably get through one combat encounter and one non-combat encounter (talking to townspeople, investigating something, dicking around at the tavern) but it all depends on the choices the players make based on the options presented by the DM.

by OneCritWonder   2018-11-10
  • You can grab the free Basic Rules PDF which has the core rules and basic character generation options.

  • You can watch tutorials like this video series. Combat episode is particularly helpful.

  • Read the Getting Started Guide in the /r/DND sidebar.


But even so, D&D 5th Edition is streamlined and easy to learn and there are tons of people willing to help teach you. Its not a game you need to sit and read the rules from cover to cover before playing, you can very much sit down to a table as totally fresh and learn by playing--I teach people this way all the time.

Consider checking out your local gaming store and see if they do any tutorials, have Organized Play, or know of groups looking for any members.

You can also use these resources: > If you're looking to play in person:

> * Check in with your local gaming store.

> * Local board game/RPG Facebook Groups

> * Local board game/RPG Meetup Groups

> * Check out the mobile app GameFor

> * Search /r/LFG for posts or make one.

> * Post in the subreddit for your town / area

> * LFG tools on Obsidian Portal and PenAndPaperGames > * Sites like FindGamers, NearbyGamers, GamerSeekingGamer

> * Check WarHorn for local postings

> If you're looking to play online:

> * /r/LFG and /r/Roll20LFG

> * Roll20's game finder and LFG forums

> * Fantasy Grounds has a LFG Forum

> * Play via Tabletop Simulator

> * Adventurer's League G+ Community

> * Adventurer's League Facebook Group

> * D&D Online Facebook Group

> * RPG Discords: Dungeons & Downvotes, Pair O' Dice, etc...


If you end up just reading up on the rules and wanting to start your own group. I highly recommend the Starter Set .

It's $15 on Amazon, has the core rules, a set of dice, premade characters, and an adventure that will last you a half dozen sessions or so. It's a great place to start--go figure--and is designed for brand new players and brand new DMs. The adventure is laid out in a way that introduces concepts as you go along rather than expecting you to know everything up front.

The premade characters are big because you want to get straight to the playing not sit there explaining character creation to a brand new player. Without the context of how things are used, its just a wall of data and memorization... which isn't fun.

You can always bring custom characters in once the group gets to town or something if people want, and now they'll kinda know the ropes.


If you decide D&D is the hobby for you, your first purchase goal should be the Player's Handbook . Its the core rulebook with all of the default character options, spells, etc.

by dragontology   2018-11-10

But then who do the books belong to? See, whenever I play D&D (or DM), I bring all my books. (At this point, I can carry them all. That could change down the line.) So if I'm not DM, I still bring the DMG and the screen and I offer them to my DM for them to use. They usually have their own, but it's nice to have a second reference.

If I buy a book, I'm not buying it for someone else. The book is mine, and they can use it when I'm there. I may even let them borrow it if they want to study it (and agree to take good care of it). (That being said, I did buy my best friend a PHB for his birthday, since I got him into the game.)

You don't need to drop $150 on the game. PHB is $28 right now on Amazon . As a player, that's all you need. That and a set of dice. Okay, you can drop $10 for a nice set of Chessex dice at your game store, or, you can spend $10 on Amazon for five random sets of 7 . Keep the set you like the best, and sell the others at your table for $2 each. Hopefully you sell all four and all of you only spent a net of $2, or maybe you just have extras. (Or maybe you sell them for $3-5 since they're not random. Maybe someone really likes one of the other colours.)