The Manga Guide to Databases

Author: Mana Takahashi, Shoko Azuma, Trend-pro Co., Ltd
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Comments

by muzani   2019-07-12
There's a manga series on STEM topics: https://www.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Databases-Mana-Takahashi/...

https://www.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Electricity-Kazuhiro-Fuji...

I actually learned more from the manga database book than from many other serious database books.

by politician   2017-08-20
Do you own The Manga Guide to Databases?

http://www.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Databases-Mana-Takahashi/d...

by artmageddon   2017-08-20
I wonder if he read the Manga guide to databases:

http://www.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Databases-Mana-Takahashi/d...

by joaorico   2017-08-20
In that case, I recommend "The Manga Guide to ..." series. [1]

I haven't read all of them, but they're a good attempt. (If you enjoy or can tolerate the quirkiness of japanese manga style.)

Check out The Manga Guide to Databases

https://smile.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Databases-Mana-Takahash...

or The Manga Guide to Statistics

https://smile.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Statistics-Shin-Takahas...

or The Manga Guide to Linear Algebra

https://smile.amazon.com/Manga-Guide-Linear-Algebra/dp/15932...

[1] https://www.nostarch.com/manga

From the top Amazon review on The Manga Guide to Databases:

"STORY: A friend loaned me this book to show her, so I gave it to her and asked her to try it. If she read the first 10 pages and it was boring, she should stop. If she liked it, she could keep it until she was done. She opened it on the spot and was 20 pages in before she realized she still was standing in the middle of our kitchen. One day later, she was finished and said it was "cool" and that she liked it.

I asked her if she learned anything or if it was just a story and she started talking. She said a little bit and talked about tables and how information is stored in columns and rows. She talked in a 9 year old's language and vocabulary, but basically explained to me the concept and benefits of centralized data stored in a single database. She made a couple other comments whose specifics I can't remember, but clearly articulated database ideas. It was somewhat surreal hearing these things come from a 3rd grader's mouth. She didn't feel like she had learned very much. I told her I probably could count on my fingers how many people at my work (300 people total - manufacturing industry, not IT) knew more about databases than she did, based on what she had finished telling me."