Avengers Volume 1: Avengers World (Marvel Now)

Category: Graphic Novels
Author: Jonathan Hickman
4.1
All Reddit 132
This Year Reddit 181
This Month Reddit 20

About This Book

The greatest heroes in comics, together as one unbeatable team!

The Avengers "go large," expanding their roster and sphere of influence to a global and even interplanetary level. When Captain America puts out his call, who will respond? The answers will surprise you! The Avengers' first mission takes them to Mars, but the secrets of the Garden lead right back to Earth's Savage Land! And when the Shi'ar Imperial Guard are broken on a dead moon, the Avengers travel across the galaxy to batt le an invading force.

It all leads up to the secret origin of the universe itself, as Captain Universe races to decipher the code hidden in the Avengers' recent adventures! Jonathan Hickman takes Earth's Mightiest Heroes to the next level with big threats, big ideas and big idealism. These are the Avengers NOW!

Comments

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Spider-Man

Ultimate Spider-Man | #1-160 | 2000-2008 | Bendis

  • Self-contained Ultimate universe where new readers can start with the very first issue and not miss anything. Hits on all major teenage Spider-Man story beats, friends, and villains. Considered one of the best modern Spider-Man runs of all time.

Spider-Man: Blue | #1-6 | 2002 | Loeb

  • Short, beautiful, touching, heart-warming story about a young Peter Parker torn between two romantic interests and maturing emotionally. Only 6 issues = a low-commitment peek at the character for new readers.

Amazing Spider-Man | #30-57, 500-545 | 2001-2007 | Straczynski

  • JMS' run is well-regarded for making Peter Parker and "average guy" again, just trying to pay rent and survive adulthood. It's dark, funny, dramatic, well-paced, and introduces new status quo/mythos, even supernatural elements.

Amazing Spider-Man (Brand New Day) | #546-647 | 2008-2010 | Slott, et al.

  • A fresh start for Peter Parker after Civil War. His memory has been reset and everything is new/different. He's back to his roots: struggling to pay rent, learning how the world works, and fighting his rogue gallery. Closest thing to a "reboot" Amazing Spider-Man has ever had = new reader friendly.

Amazing Spider-Man (Big Time) | #648-700.5 | 2010-2013 | Slott, et al.

  • Peter Parker's back in a groove, he's leading the Avengers, has a new girlfriend, and landed a major career opportunity. This eventually sets up one of the coolest modern Spidey stories in Superior Spider-Man below.

Superior Spider-Man | #1-33 | 2013-2014 | Slott, et al.

  • An impostor takes over for Spider-Man. Very different from usual Spidey characterization = refreshing.

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

From the wiki:

Avengers

   Modern Essentials

Google the art for Busiek's Avengers.

Are you just looking for someone to reduce your options down to 1-2 series? Just read Ultimates then:

Ultimates , Ultimates 2 | #1-13, #1-13 | 2002-2007 | Millar

  • Alternate-universe Avengers with different/exaggerated characterizations: Captain America is a hyper-nationalist soldier-grunt, a meek/bullied Bruce Banner and lusting/rampaging Hulk, Iron Man has cancer, Thor is an activist hippie, Dr. Pym is despicable, the team does more damage then they're worth, etc. It's a fun, cinematic, superheroes-are-flawed, and silly take.

> the reading order jumps between several series

Which reading order? Do you NOT want to jump between different series? Are you looking for a single series like Injustice?

What were you looking for from the wiki guide? What kind of information did expect/you want to see? More? Less? Different organization/format? This feedback helps.

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> I love the MCU because it all happens in one universe, and it makes sense

Imagine someone who has never seen a movie. What would you recommend they watch first? It's a difficult task without knowing more about them. Your job as curator and guide is to (1) make sure they don't start with Jurassic Park 3 and (2) address their "too many options" concerns with a handful of personalized recommendations. Consider this scenario:

Person 1: "I've never seen a movie. What should I watch?"

Person 2: "What are your favorite TV shows, books, games, etc.?"

Person 1: "Magicians and Harry Potter"

Person 2: "Seems like you enjoy magic and fantasy. Check out the Doctor Strange movie. Don't worry, it's relatively standalone. The references/cameos are just bonuses for those heavily invested."

Person 1: "Are there other movies in a larger cinematic universe? I like to know everything."

Person 2: "You haven't seen a single movie before. How could you possibly... *sigh* Well, you can watch the entire MCU, but that's a much more ambitious/narrow introduction to the medium. On second thought, it might be better to start with some classics like Spirited Away, Pan's Labyrinth, The Wizard of Oz, etc. instead..."

> I like to know everything.

It's great that you've discovered your preferences/passions with Marvel TV/film, but don't let that determine/limit your ability to try new things. I promise that you are capable of enjoyment without knowing everything. You're enjoying the MCU without knowing about the source material. You don't need a deep understanding of cryptography to invest in bitcoin. Find a hobby that interests you, explore the smaller entry-level environment, and expand as you see fit. Do the same for comics.

Compartmentalize comics into smaller chunks of a larger universe. There's no need to tackle 55+ years of continuity immediately. That's just ONE aspect of comic fun. Wiki summaries are more efficient than the actual comics for that kind of information, anyway. Most are primarily reading for quality storytelling/enjoyment rather than encyclopedic knowledge.

> Having to deal with all of the different universes in the comics seems very scary

How do we read? One word, one sentence, one book at a time. Linear. At first, you will only read smaller story arcs, a handful of characters, one universe, etc. at a time.

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Avoid over-analyzing—just start reading. Do you prefer old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Character/plot -driven story? Explicit content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t get a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Reading primarily for enjoyment or encyclopedic knowledge? Collecting? Have the time/resources to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t necessarily ideal starting points. Writers change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many great characters, creators, publishers, etc. to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained, complete stories in one corner of the universe. There will be unexplained references/characters, just persevere or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled web of shared-universe comics overwhelm you. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally see the big picture.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Don’t get stuck preparing/over-analyzing, just start reading. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t understand a reference? Maybe read that next.

Acquire/Buy comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/mo or $70/yr for all but new releases), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Marvel

DC

Or skip to the 2016 re-launch DC Universe: Rebirth event and then any Rebirth series #1.

Other

by Tigertemprr   2018-11-10

> I could just pick up a n52 issue 0 or 1 and feel confident that I wasnt missing out on lore or events (for most characters)

Well, that's just a matter of perspective, right? You DID miss out on lore/events that happened before and give context to all the changes that were made in New 52 (post-Crisis + Flashpoint). Some highly celebrated runs like Morrison's Batman and Johns' Green Lantern started BEFORE New 52. If you're reading superhero comics by "era" (e.g. Marvel NOW!, Marvel Now 2.0, Dark Reign, Bendis event era, All-New All-Different, etc.), then you just have to find a reading order.

Personally, I recommend being a little more "loose" in how you read i.e. reading by "mood" instead, regardless of publication date or era. Start with self-contained, recommended starting points and just read, read, read.

> For example lets say I'm interested in Spiderman

Here's my usual new Marvel comic reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic superhero knowledge? Plan to collect? Do you have the time/money to read 50 or 500 comics per character?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, etc. for now. Think of it like solving a jigsaw puzzle one small piece at a time until you finally start to see the big picture. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so they aren’t always ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their most popular/acclaimed stories. Focus on self-contained/complete stories. You will encounter unexplained references/characters/events—just keep reading or Wiki. Don’t let the tangled interconnectedness of shared-universe comics overwhelm you.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Avoid over-analyzing—just start reading. Do you prefer old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Character/plot -driven story? Explicit content? Follow these instincts. Didn’t get a reference? Make that your next read.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) by Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about stories/characters from TV, movies, games, etc. that you already like. Do you seek “good” storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Are you here to collect or read? How much time/resources are available?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters and publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Marvel Unlimited / Comixology for digital. instocktrades for physical (US). ISBNS for price aggregate.

Recommendations:

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

Title Writer Note
Alias (Jessica Jones) Brian Bendis
Ultimates 1-2 (Avengers) Mark Millar Ultimate
Avengers / New Avengers Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2
Black Panther Christopher Priest
Captain America Ed Brubaker
Captain Marvel Kelly Sue DeConnick
Daredevil (2001) Brian Bendis
Daredevil (2014) Mark Waid
Deadpool Joe Kelly
Doctor Strange: The Oath Brian K. Vaughan
Fantastic Four / FF Jonathan Hickman Hickman 1
Hawkeye Matt Fraction
Immortal Iron Fist Brubaker & Fraction
Inhumans Paul Jenkins
Iron Man: Extremis Warren Ellis Iron Man 1
Invincible Iron Man Matt Fraction Iron Man 2
Marvels (Marvel History) Kurt Busiek
Moon Knight Warren Ellis
Ms. Marvel G. Willow Wilson
Planet Hulk Greg Pack Hulk 1
Punisher Max Garth Ennis
Thor Jason Aaron
Ultimate Spider-man Brian Bendis Ultimate
Vision Tom King
New X-Men Grant Morrison X-Men 1
Astonishing X-Men Joss Whedon X-Men 2
Uncanny X-Force Rick Remender X-Men 6

Check out the /r/Marvel sidebar for more.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Title Writer Note
Avengers Disassembled Brian Bendis
Secret War Brian Bendis
House of M Brian Bendis X-Men 2.5
Annihilation Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic 1
Civil War Mark Millar
World War Hulk Greg Pak Hulk 2
Annihilation: Conquest Abnett, Lanning, Giffen Cosmic 2
Messiah Complex Brubaker, Kyle, Yost, et al. X-Men 3
Secret Invasion Brian Bendis Dark Reign
War Abnett, Lanning, et al. Cosmic 3
Messiah War Kyle, Yost, Swierczynski X-Men 4
Dark Avengers / Utopia Bendis, Fraction, et al. Dark Reign
Siege Brian Bendis Dark Reign
Realm of Kings Abnett, Lanning, Reed Cosmic 4
Second Coming Kyle, Yost, Fraction, et al. X-Men 5
Fear Itself Matt Fraction
Schism Jason Aaron, Kieron Gillen X-Men 7
Avengers vs. X-Men Bendis, Brubaker, et al. X-Men 8
Infinity Jonathan Hickman Hickman 2.5
Secret Wars Jonathan Hickman Hickman 3

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like older/newer comics? Weird concepts? Super-smart meta-analysis and social commentary? Family-friendly content? Hyper-violence? Male/female protagonists? Humor? Horror? Have you noticed that a specific artist, writer, or creative team consistently produces content you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve the guide are welcome.

by Tigertemprr   2018-03-19

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite stories/characters from TV, movies, games, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How much time/resources are available i.e. how deep do you want to dive?

Don’t try to read everything—there’s too much. Forget about “catching up”, continuity, universes, and timelines; it's all very confusing, even to creators/fans. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so first appearances/early origins may not be the best starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told (e.g. I never cared for Hawkeye until Matt Fractions’ run).

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their “greatest hits”. Don’t get stuck “preparing”, just start reading. Focus on well-received, relatively self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter the occasional unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along (Wiki if necessary). Remember, there are so many other great characters/creators/publishers to explore, and not all comics are about superheroes.

Where to buy (US):

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited, Comixology, e-library (e.g. Hoopla - free), webcomics (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS

Modern Marvel characters/teams:

/r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Generally, the best non-event comics integrate these seamlessly or avoid them entirely (notwithstanding editorial/executive mandates). Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Modern Marvel events/crossovers:

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Literary/natural narratives? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? Social/political commentary? Family-friendly/explicit content? Optimism/pessimism? Have you noticed that a specific artist/writer consistently makes comics you like? Follow these instincts.

Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome.

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Modern Marvel - Starter Recommendations

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

   Moon Knight

   Spider-Man

   General

by Tigertemprr   2018-02-16

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring/buying comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the Marvel Comics Guide in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

Alternatively, try these attempts at "complete" reading orders: ComicBookHerald, CMRO.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

> He buys weekly comics digitally on the marvel website

Make sure you look into Marvel Unlimited ($10/month, $70/year for everything but newest 6 months)

> He wants to own the essential stories of Marvel?

It's really difficult to categorize specific story arcs as "essential". You have to provide additional parameters like "all movie-related comics", "classic (pre-1980s) comics" or "essential event/crossover comics", otherwise, everyone will have a different definition, a different list, and ALL of them are going to be very extensive.

Here's an example of a Modern Essentials Events/Crossovers list. Note: There are no "solo" character series here so you are missing a lot of the context. Depending on your reading preferences, that might still be OK or you might feel compelled to check out everything in the "Reading Order" visual guides.

If you're more interested in understanding Marvel's history/continuity, then I recommend just reading wiki summaries—it'll catch you up much faster than reading thousands of comics. While not necessarily mutually exclusive, if you're reading primarily for enjoyment of the story (quality writing/art), then I suggest picking a character/team that seems interesting and seeking their "greatest hits".

Here's my usual new reader guide:

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. Don’t get stuck preparing to read. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like: old/new comics? Specific genres? Specific writers? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

Introduction to Comics

How to Get Into Comic Books (13:40) | Patrick Willems

Consider your intent/commitment. Think about your favorite shows, movies, books, etc. Do you seek quality storytelling or encyclopedic Marvel knowledge? Plan to collect? How deep are you willing to dive?

Don’t try to read everything at once. There’s too much. Forget about catching up, continuity, universes, and timelines. Older comics can be an acquired taste for modern audiences, so 1st appearances/early origins may not be ideal starting points. Creative teams change often, characters get re-worked, and origins are re-told. Remember, there are many other great characters, creators, publishers, and genres to explore.

Pick an interesting character/team and seek their best stories. It's much easier to focus on one part of the universe—think of it as solving a jigsaw puzzle one piece at a time. Don’t get stuck preparing or over-analyzing, just start reading. Focus on acclaimed, self-contained, and complete stories. You may encounter an unexplained reference/character/event—just ride along or Wiki.

Events/crossovers can be fun and/or tedious. They are most appreciated by readers well-versed in relevant continuity. Sometimes, company-wide stories interrupt smaller stories and your favorite characters' personalities change briefly. Regardless, you may want to familiarize with major plot points.

Discover your preferences and let them guide you. Do you like/dislike old/new comics? Specific writers/genres? Cartoony/realistic art? Familiar/weird concepts? References/self-contained? All-ages/mature content? Follow these instincts.

Acquiring comics:

  • Digital: Marvel Unlimited ($10/month for everything but newest 6 months), Comixology, e-library (free), webcomic (free)
  • Print (collected editions): instocktrades, ISBNS, library (free)
  • Print (singles): midtowncomics, mycomicshop, DCBS, local store

Recommendations

 


Suggestions to improve this guide are welcome. Check out the guide to the comic universe in the /r/Marvel sidebar for more info.

by Tigertemprr   2017-12-06

I've never understood the "I'm more of a X publisher guy". It's like saying "I only watch Warner Brothers movies". Sure, house-styles/preferences are more pronounced since comics were a medium largely dominated by two major publishers shipping almost exclusively superhero stories for decades, but it doesn't really make sense to be exclusive anymore. There are great comics from Marvel, Image, Dark Horse, IDW, Boom!, etc. just like there are great movies from Legendary, A24, Fox, Columbia, Universal, Disney, Paramount, etc. Good stories > brand loyalty. Broaden your horizons. Try some non-superhero comics, too (check out DC Vertigo if you haven't already).

Regarding recommendations, you'd have to tell us more about your preferences for a more personalized list. Here is some general "good" Marvel stuff: