The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition

Category: Engineering
Author: Don Norman
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by kebman   2020-10-06
I don't have a TV, only a few monitors (it's very liberating, actually). So instead I'll talk about my microwave. Yes, unironically! :D It has two dials. OMG how do I survive with only two dials? How do I program it? Well, the answer is, unsurprisingly, that I don't program it. Instead I crank it to watever wattage I need (usually the top one), and the time I think it'll take until the food I becomes hot. Aaaand that's it. No programming. No fiddling or mindlessly pushing buttons in the hopes of finding the right one. Only two dials. One for wattage (power output), and the other for time. I think it's really great. There's even some indicators on the Watt-dial for thawing and stuff like that, but I seldom need it, so I usually just keep it rested on 800W. It's the required wattage for most TV dinners anyway. And hot pockets. Don't forget hot pockets guys. How would I survive without...... If you didn't get it, this is actually a post about UIs, and how much I love the book The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman.[1]

[1]: https://www.amazon.com/Design-Everyday-Things-Revised-Expand...

by myguysi   2019-05-10
UX is a huge field with a lot of entry points so it’s difficult so suggest a single resource to start with.

However I’d suggest that coming from an engineering background, you might find joy in learning about user testing first as that’s usually a big eye-opener that helps you understand why the field of UX design is important.

A classic book to start with is “Don’t Make Me Think” by Steve Krug[0], which covers usability testing and even how to conduct a session yourself.

Then there’s “The Design of Everyday Things” by Don Norman[1], whom many consider the ‘father’ of the modern field of UX. That one can be a bit dense though.

If you want to think like a designer, then learning about Design Thinking[2] is a good place to start.

Hope that helps!

[0] https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Make-Think-Revisited-Usability/d...

[1] https://www.amazon.com/Design-Everyday-Things-Revised-Expand...

[2] https://www.ideou.com/pages/design-thinking

by machtesh   2018-12-02
The Design of Everyday Things by Don Norman

https://www.amazon.com/Design-Everyday-Things-Revised-Expand...

by dictum   2018-01-19
Related reading list:

https://www.amazon.com/Design-Everyday-Things-Revised-Expand...

https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Make-Think-Revisited-Usability/d...

by taeric   2017-09-18
This seems to be blurring a use of "design". Not all design is chrome on top of things. Some literally leads to better use. Some design is required for safe use.

I think it is oversold, but the book "Design of Everyday Things"[1] goes over this for many common items. There is a long section on doors with many interesting points to consider.

[1] https://www.amazon.com/Design-Everyday-Things-Revised-Expand...

by lykwydchykyn   2017-08-19

It's not specific to software, but I feel like anyone working with UX should read this first: https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0465050654

by mysticreddit   2017-08-19

My day job is WebGL + UI; for UI I'd recommend:

Also take a look at what industrial design courses are available.

by HookahComputer   2017-08-19

Amazon link for today's lucky 10,000