Buddhism with an Attitude: The Tibetan Seven-Point Mind Training

Category: Mental Health
Author: B. Alan Wallace
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by mindroll   2019-11-17

"The Buddhist teaching is that it is possible to neutralize negative karmic seeds embedded in the stream of consciousness. Deeds cannot be undone, but it is possible to purify one's mind-stream so that the impact of karmic seeds will be nullified. The method used to purify the mind-stream is the "four remedial powers." The metaphor for the effectiveness of the four remedial powers is that of burning a seed. Karma, like a seed, can be scorched in the fire of purification so that it will not sprout. The seed won't vanish, but it will not sprout.

The first of the four remedial powers is remorse, regarding a misdeed as detrimental. Remorse is sincerely focusing on a misdeed, taking responsibility for it, and regretting having done it. Remorse also includes acknowledging consequences... Remorse is hazardous when conflated with guilt. Remorse is wholesome because it focuses on an event. Guilt is an afflictive state of mind focused on the self as in, "I am an unworthy person." Guilt, a reification of the self around negative tendencies, is simply another mental affliction. Properly directed remorse, on the other hand, can be very helpful for disengaging from unwholesome tendencies.

... The second remedial power is reliance. When we have harmed other sentient beings, the remedial power of reliance is cultivating compassion for others;

... The third of the four remedial powers is resolve, turning away from misconduct. The power of resolve is stopping unwholesome behavior by the strength of determination and decision.

The final remedial power is purification. This is also called "applying the antidote," and entails doing something that counteracts or neutralizes the negative deeds. For example, if the deed involved killing, applying the antidote would be protecting life." - B. Alan Wallace https://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Attitude-Tibetan-Seven-Point-Training/dp/1559392002

by mindroll   2019-11-17

"The Buddhist teaching is that it is possible to neutralize negative karmic seeds embedded in the stream of consciousness. Deeds cannot be undone, but it is possible to purify one's mind-stream so that the impact of karmic seeds will be nullified. The method used to purify the mind-stream is the "four remedial powers." The metaphor for the effectiveness of the four remedial powers is that of burning a seed. Karma, like a seed, can be scorched in the fire of purification so that it will not sprout. The seed won't vanish, but it will not sprout.

The first of the four remedial powers is remorse, regarding a misdeed as detrimental. Remorse is sincerely focusing on a misdeed, taking responsibility for it, and regretting having done it. Remorse also includes acknowledging consequences... Remorse is hazardous when conflated with guilt. Remorse is wholesome because it focuses on an event. Guilt is an afflictive state of mind focused on the self as in, "I am an unworthy person." Guilt, a reification of the self around negative tendencies, is simply another mental affliction. Properly directed remorse, on the other hand, can be very helpful for disengaging from unwholesome tendencies.

... The second remedial power is reliance. When we have harmed other sentient beings, the remedial power of reliance is cultivating compassion for others;

... The third of the four remedial powers is resolve, turning away from misconduct. The power of resolve is stopping unwholesome behavior by the strength of determination and decision.

The final remedial power is purification. This is also called "applying the antidote," and entails doing something that counteracts or neutralizes the negative deeds. For example, if the deed involved killing, applying the antidote would be protecting life." - B. Alan Wallace https://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Attitude-Tibetan-Seven-Point-Training/dp/1559392002

by mindroll   2019-11-17

B. Alan Wallace's commentary: "The Buddhist teaching is that it is possible to neutralize negative karmic seeds embedded in the stream of consciousness. Deeds cannot be undone, but it is possible to purify one's mind-stream so that the impact of karmic seeds will be nullified. The method used to purify the mind-stream is the "four remedial powers." The metaphor for the effectiveness of the four remedial powers is that of burning a seed. Karma, like a seed, can be scorched in the fire of purification so that it will not sprout. The seed won't vanish, but it will not sprout.

The first of the four remedial powers is remorse, regarding a misdeed as detrimental. Remorse is sincerely focusing on a misdeed, taking responsibility for it, and regretting having done it. Remorse also includes acknowledging consequences... Remorse is hazardous when conflated with guilt. Remorse is wholesome because it focuses on an event. Guilt is an afflictive state of mind focused on the self as in, "I am an unworthy person." Guilt, a reification of the self around negative tendencies, is simply another mental affliction. Properly directed remorse, on the other hand, can be very helpful for disengaging from unwholesome tendencies.

... The second remedial power is reliance. When we have harmed other sentient beings, the remedial power of reliance is cultivating compassion for others;

... The third of the four remedial powers is resolve, turning away from misconduct. The power of resolve is stopping unwholesome behavior by the strength of determination and decision.

The final remedial power is purification. This is also called "applying the antidote," and entails doing something that counteracts or neutralizes the negative deeds. For example, if the deed involved killing, applying the antidote would be protecting life." https://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Attitude-Tibetan-Seven-Point-Training/dp/1559392002

by KimUn   2018-11-10

"The greater your intelligence, the greater your understanding and wisdom, the greater impact your actions have. Animals accumulate a small amount of karma for aggression, but a human being with the same behavior accumulates much heavier karma.... From the Buddhist perspective, compassion is rare in the animal realm but it is there. In the hungry ghost realm, compassion is even rarer, and rarer still in the hell realms. However, again there is a loophole. Because of the relative difficulty of compassion in non-human realms, the karmic significance of even a little bit of compassion is great. It is said that in a hell realm, a being who has compassion for another is immediately liberated." -B. Alan Wallace https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/1559392002

"The Buddha taught in the Sutra of Repaying the Kindness that he had been reborn as a strong man in hell, where he pulled a cart across red-hot iron ground. A hell guardian was continually beating his weak companion. The Buddha had affection for his companion and said to the hell guardian, "Have some pity on him!" This made the guardian furious, and he stabbed the Buddha with a trident, ending his life. This purified the Buddha of hundreds of eon's worth of bad karma." https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/086171444X

by KimUn   2018-11-10

Hi, sorry for the late reply.

> The second remedial power is reliance. When we have harmed other sentient beings, the remedial power of reliance is cultivating compassion for others;

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/1559392002

> the power of "reliance," entailing taking refuge in the Three Jewels and cultivating compassion.

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/1559390514

by KimUn   2018-11-10

"The first of the four remedial powers is remorse, regarding a misdeed as detrimental. Remorse is sincerely focusing on a misdeed, taking responsibility for it, and regretting having done it. Remorse also includes acknowledging consequences.

... Remorse is hazardous when conflated with guilt. Remorse is wholesome because it focuses on an event. Guilt is an afflictive state of mind focused on the self as in, "I am an unworthy person." Guilt, a reification of the self around negative tendencies, is simply another mental affliction. Properly directed remorse, on the other hand, can be very helpful for disengaging from unwholesome tendencies." -B. Alan Wallace https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/1559392002