Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft (Llewellyn's Practical Magick)

Author: Raymond Buckland
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by Au-riel   2019-01-13

I’d recommend you start with reading.

Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and Buckland's Book of Spirit Communications are good books for getting a decent understanding of what could be (subjectively speaking) considered “traditional” witchcraft. I myself am NOT a fan of the Llewellyn branch of magick, as it is heavily based around forming structured groups and covens and much of the information seems more ceremonial than anything. That being said, these books give a great basic rundown into alot of different styles and tools you will most likely be using or want to use.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner is great if you want to go down the Wicca path AND it’s made specifically for solitary practitioners along with having some of Scott Cunninghams own spells in it as well.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a good rundown of many common and uncommon reagents used in witchcraft along with their metaphysical uses. Reader's Digest Magic and Medicine of Plants despite the name is a more practical and scientifically written book on the historical and medicinal used of many N. American plants.

Inside the Mirror Box: Spells and Theory for All Practitioners was actually written by a friend of mine. His book gives alot of information on actual spellwork, along with a large selection of Mirror Box spells and a short section on other uses for mirrors (such as divination).

And finally the Encyclopedia of Spirits is a great reference guide for those of us who want to work with specific entities. The author covers the full gamut of spirits and deities from the ancient gods to christian saints and archangels to lesser known spirits.

Also go talk to your mom, she what she knows and can teach. A real life teacher is better than any book imo.

by Fey_fox   2019-01-13

I'd say today I'm a non-denominational Pagan. I am a member of OBOD, but there are no seed groves near me and I tend to do my own thing anyway.

The Buckland book I'm talking about is this one . It's a good beginner book for Wicca. So, Traditional Wiccans in a tradition like... say Gardinarian for example. They all have 'rules' they follow like how they call the Watchtowers (directions). They often work via a lineage, like some traditions wouldn't call you official unless you can say which coven trained you. If you wanted to be a true Gardinarian you'd have to find a Gardinarian coven and do the work to get initiated and educated to the point where you could become a HP/HPS and start your own, and that takes years. The diversity comes from the flexibility within the tradition, some traditions allow for more flexibility than others.

And then came the advent of books. Back in the day (60's-70's) you could only get into Wicca by knowing people and getting involved with a Coven. Books of Shadows were never published, and they were heavy on the secrecy. To readers digest history, stuff kinda started changing in the 60's and 70's as more books started to get published, rather in tandem with the cultural revolution at the time. Dianic Wicca and other lady-centric wiccan traditions in tandem with the Feminist movement played a big part in making Wicca more visible to the general public. Stuff began changing in general. People tired of the old school flogging and ritual binding and long drawn out initiations and the ever so very hetero centric 'must have male/female' stuff the old school Wiccan covens had, people began to break off.

Shit really got going in the 80's as more books began to be published about Wicca, and many had solo practitioners in mind. Authors like Scott Cunningham, Raymond Buckland, and others were all people who once were in a Trad coven who broke off and started their own groups or focused on providing info for Solitary Wiccans. Others like Starhawk, Z Budapest, Selena Fox, and many more started their own traditions without coming to Wicca via an old school tradition (seemingly). They were self taught via study through academia or came to it via the Feminist movement or through personal research.

Anyway, lots of history to unpack and I barely scraped any of it. Eclectic Wicca is just a Wiccan group that pulls from many sources and also makes up some of their own stuff, like rituals and whatever. All of this diversity stems from the lack of dogma, and IMO Wicca has a basic structure that's easy to learn, but can be complex and flexible. Celtic Holidays can be replaced with Roman, Strega (Italian), Germanic, etc. ones. The Rede can and often is rewritten to reflect the person/s values in the group, and the basic system of circle casting with the watchtowers can be replaced with winds or directions or animals.

What is good about it is it can grow and change as you do. That's why there's so much diversity, people change and they change their practice, and the traditions are so people can stick together if they want to.

If that makes sense.

by Au-riel   2019-01-13

Here’s some books!

Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and Buckland's Book of Spirit Communications are good books for getting a decent understanding of what could be (subjectively speaking) considered “traditional” witchcraft. I myself am NOT a fan of the Llewellyn branch of magick, as it is heavily based around forming structured groups and covens and much of the information seems more ceremonial than anything. That being said, these books give a great basic rundown into alot of different styles and tools you will most likely be using or want to use.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner is great if you want to go down the Wicca path AND it’s made specifically for solitary practitioners along with having some of Scott Cunninghams own spells in it as well.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a good rundown of many common and uncommon reagents used in witchcraft along with their metaphysical uses. Reader's Digest Magic and Medicine of Plants despite the name is a more practical and scientifically written book on the historical and medicinal used of many N. American plants.

Inside the Mirror Box: Spells and Theory for All Practitioners was actually written by a friend of mine. His book gives alot of information on actual spellwork, along with a large selection of Mirror Box spells and a short section on other uses for mirrors (such as divination).

And finally the Encyclopedia of Spirits is a great reference guide for those of us who want to work with specific entities. The author covers the full gamut of spirits and deities from the ancient gods to christian saints and archangels to lesser known spirits.

Grow Lavender, it’s an amazing herb useful for all sort of spells and rituals

by Au-riel   2018-11-10

This is almost the exact order I started with over a few years.

Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and Buckland's Book of Spirit Communications are good books for getting a decent understanding of what could be (subjectively speaking) considered “traditional” witchcraft. I myself am NOT a fan of the Llewellyn branch of magick, as it is heavily based around forming structured groups and covens and much of the information seems more ceremonial than anything. That being said, these books give a great basic rundown into alot of different styles and tools you will most likely be using or want to use.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner is great if you want to go down the Wicca path AND it’s made specifically for solitary practitioners along with having some of Scott Cunninghams own spells in it as well.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a good rundown of many common and uncommon reagents used in witchcraft along with their metaphysical uses. Reader's Digest Magic and Medicine of Plants despite the name is a more practical and scientifically written book on the historical and medicinal used of many N. American plants.

Inside the Mirror Box: Spells and Theory for All Practitioners was actually written by a friend of mine. His book gives alot of information on actual spellwork, along with a large selection of Mirror Box spells and a short section on other uses for mirrors (such as divination).

Ultimately, we all practice a bit differently but it never hurts to take in as much information as possible!

And finally the Encyclopedia of Spirits is a great reference guide for those of us who want to work with specific entities. The author covers the full gamut of spirits and deities from the ancient gods to christian saints and archangels to lesser known spirits.

by Au-riel   2018-11-10

I’ve yet to meet any local covens with more than like 4-5 members and who follow a strict rulebook for their group. Normally they just seem to be groups of friends who get together to perform ceremonies and rituals and share secrets.

I think a coven is what you make of it. If you get the big blue book of magick (https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0875420508) I believe there is a section in there with specific rules for starting a coven. Honestly though, to me, the book is more of a novelty and hasn’t ever really taught me anything.

by popemichael   2018-11-10

I'm a chaos magician, so I may not be the best to answer that one depending on your own path.

Personally I'd recommend "Oven-Ready Chaos" by Phil Hine - It goes over a lot of the basics. (read it here)

Barring that you can always break out "Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft" by Raymond Buckland (amazon link )

Personally, I'd recommend finding someone local to study under. Being a solitary is great but a lot of people can get a lot more from learning from a real person.

Feel free to ask me any questions, however. Though like I said, my perspective of magic is that of a chaosist and Discordian. So that means that "Everything is right, even the wrong things" is a motto of mine (a'la the Principia Discordia)

by Au-riel   2018-11-10

Read, read, read, read! There is so much information to digest and we all have different paths so what I like to do is read as much as possible

Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and Buckland's Book of Spirit Communications are good books for getting a decent understanding of what could be (subjectively speaking) considered “traditional” witchcraft. I myself am NOT a fan of the Llewellyn branch of magick, as it is heavily based around forming structured groups and covens and much of the information seems more ceremonial than anything. That being said, these books give a great basic rundown into alot of different styles and tools you will most likely be using or want to use.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner is great if you want to go down the Wicca path AND it’s made specifically for solitary practitioners along with having some of Scott Cunninghams own spells in it as well.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a good rundown of many common and uncommon reagents used in witchcraft along with their metaphysical uses. Reader's Digest Magic and Medicine of Plants despite the name is a more practical and scientifically written book on the historical and medicinal used of many N. American plants.

Inside the Mirror Box: Spells and Theory for All Practitioners was actually written by a friend of mine. His book gives alot of information on actual spellwork, along with a large selection of Mirror Box spells and a short section on other uses for mirrors (such as divination).

And finally the Encyclopedia of Spirits is a great reference guide for those of us who want to work with specific entities. The author covers the full gamut of spirits and deities from the ancient gods to christian saints and archangels to lesser known spirits.

by Au-riel   2018-11-10

I’d recommend you start with reading. One of these books is specific to Wicca the religion, and the others are more broad studies on witchcraft. Wicca is a religion that incorporates a lot of witchcraft, so it’s good to understand some of the stuff you’ll he doing.

Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and Buckland's Book of Spirit Communications are good books for getting a decent understanding of what could be (subjectively speaking) considered “traditional” witchcraft. I myself am NOT a fan of the Llewellyn branch of magick, as it is heavily based around forming structured groups and covens and much of the information seems more ceremonial than anything. That being said, these books give a great basic rundown into alot of different styles and tools you will most likely be using or want to use.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner is great if you want to go down the Wicca path AND it’s made specifically for solitary practitioners along with having some of Scott Cunninghams own spells in it as well.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a good rundown of many common and uncommon reagents used in witchcraft along with their metaphysical uses. Reader's Digest Magic and Medicine of Plants despite the name is a more practical and scientifically written book on the historical and medicinal used of many N. American plants.

And finally the Encyclopedia of Spirits is a great reference guide for those of us who want to work with specific entities. The author covers the full gamut of spirits and deities from the ancient gods to christian saints and archangels to lesser known spirits.

by snxwfall   2018-11-10

Buy some books on the subject, Is recommend some history books on the subject rather than book that have spells and what not. I bought the big blue which is a work book that goes over everything in general and it has been very helpful thus far.

https://toptalkedbooks.com/amzn/0875420508